Posts Tagged ‘a Happy Holiday Season’

It’s What You do Next that Counts

September 1, 2015

In college I worked for a drilling company to pay for school. We were in the Big Bend country of Texas. Whatever the word is after desolate, that’s the Big Bend. I worked with a driller who had brought his family with him to live in the desert southwest. We became close in a very short time. I had all of my meals with them, played with their 2 year old son, sat on the porch and drank beer with Rocky, my driller.

We worked 3 shifts on this site, Rocky and I had the 8am to 5pm shift. On this day we worked our shift, went back to our quarters (there was no motel, just an abandoned set of rooms we occupied…primitive) had dinner and went to bed. Rocky awakened me at 1 or 2 am. The graveyard shift couldn’t work. One of their crew had been seriously injured in a car wreck. So, off we went.

Working all night was different, but all the same things had to be done. Somewhere around first light we were pulling the drill stem (pipe) out of the hole. About 900+ feet of pipe at this point. We had only pulled a few  lengths of pipe when it happened. There was no warning. Nothing to anticipate. Just react. Something slipped. It did not hold the pipe in place as we disconnected lengths and reconnected the tools to lift the drill stem from the hole. I was in the tower, 20+ feet off the drill floor. Rocky was on the drill floor handling the 2” steel cable spool that lifted the pipe from the hole.

When “it” slipped all hell broke loose for about 20 seconds. The rig was bounced with a terrible jolt as Rocky pulled on the spool brake to stop the cable which was attached to almost 900 feet of pipe. That jolt bent some very strong iron platforms like it was cardboard. The steel cable snapped, flew into the air and grazed my face. Only a grease mark. Another ¼” and my eye was gone.

I looked down and that’s when I saw Rocky. Bent over, holding his right hand, in obvious agony and pain. Not a word, not a whimper. He was a big, tough German. He told me to cut his glove off. I did. What I saw next has never left my memory. Rocky worked with his hands and that was at an end. I got him back to our quarters, his wife packed his hand in ice, they drove 90 miles to the nearest hospital. There is a lot more to tell you about this event. The lessons I’ve taken from it are numerous and significant.

But here’s where THE lesson came from that terrible day. I stayed with the rig and our quarters. It was a very rough country of folks down there. About 2 days later I had everything secured and I went to see Rocky. Somehow I felt I had made a mistake. I knew he couldn’t. Somehow I blamed myself, and not all of that feeling has left me even today. But Rocky assured me it was no one’s fault. “Just one of those things.” Then he told me the greatest lesson I believe I’ve had from such an event. He said, “Ed, what’s happened is done. No one’s to blame. But… it’s what YOU do next that counts.”

So, we unpack the debris, both literal and figuratively. And we do it for all events good or bad. Because what we do next will count for a long, long time. Whether it’s a change in our company, setting goals, changing ourselves, whatever. It’s what you do next that counts.

Advertisements

What is Your Legacy?

April 2, 2015

The first lesson is Leadership and Mentoring is be a guide, tutor, coach, leader. This is where we learn to leverage our own qualities and our ability to create output by teaching and helping others. We know how Trusted Mentors will leave their mark. Sound advice, guidance, love and examples. They help with personal growth and are important in shaping a young mind.
So, we have to ask: What is our legacy? Who can we help? How can we shape the lives and futures of others? Who can we remove from a negative place? What marks are we leaving along the path for the next generation? Here’s the important thing: We may be successful, but we have an obligation to pass on what we’ve learned. It is not ours to keep. It is ours to pass on.

With mentoring you may never know how your legacy will continue to grow and influence others. Some may take 50 + years to be recognized.

When I was 11 years old it was a big deal to be in the “A” league in Little League baseball. I was fortunate enough to be there. We were returning Champs. Several of us had be on the “All Star” team. Tryouts are held each year and boys are picked for teams in the A, B & C leagues. Our coach picked a boy I didn’t think belonged on an “A” team. Somehow I had appointed myself judge. This young boy lived down the street from me. He couldn’t throw the ball out of his shadow. We could have had another boy who could really play. But the coach knew he should select him. He came from an unfortunate family situation. They struggled with everything. The self-esteem of everyone in the family was low. I now know after 50+ years this was one of the most important things I have ever witnessed. I now know how much it helped that boy and helped his family. I now know how wrong I was to judge that boy and to judge the coach’s choice. The coach was my Dad. He was gone by the time of my ‘awakening.’ I didn’t get to tell him how proud I was of this unselfish mentoring decision. I’ve told him in prayer. I am telling him now in a forum that will live in the public forever. It took 50+ years for my dense head to get it. But I’ve got it now. I’m proud of him for his legacy.

My Thanksgiving Wish for You

November 23, 2014

Family and Friends. Turkey and football. Jingle Bells and Oh Holy Night. The scent of a Christmas tree. Smiles and laughter.

I hope I am the first to wish you a Happy Holiday Season! Starting with

Happy Thanksgiving!

Here are some thoughts as we go into the season I’d like to share with you.

 

I am thankful for Stefanie Wargala, Griff’s finance, and Erin Burris, Drew’s wife. They are great additions to our family!!

I am grateful for My Marilyn and our boys; My brother & sister and their families.  We need to tell our families how much we love them.

I am asking God to give a kiss to the loved ones we no longer see.

I am grateful I have a spiritual life.

I am thankful for my friends. There aren’t enough words to express my love and devotion to the true friends in my life. I wish health for you in our journey through time.

I am grateful for the opportunity to work. I cannot imagine sitting down. There are just too many people yet to meet.

I am thankful for the friends I have made through my work, my clients and associates. I see you more than my family.

I am thankful that I need a moment when they play TAPS for a soldier. Please say ‘thank you’ to our older veterans too.

I am thankful I can vote.

I am thankful for the people who believe in me and for those who along the way gave me a chance with their confidence and trust.

I’m glad there are those of us who still believe we should say “Merry Christmas”.

I am grateful when you stand up for what is right. Not just soldiers and first responders. Ordinary folks like us who will not allow an injustice to go unchecked.

Most of all, I am thankful for you. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving, Merry Christmas and a Happy Holiday Season.

Sincerely,

Ed Gideon